Monday, November 07, 2005

Personal Computers, Servers Or ISP?

You need a server to host your site so that it can be viewed over the internet. This server can either be an Internet Service Provider or of your own. Most websites are hosted by an Internet Service Provider because they can provide powerful server hardware, high speed connections and reliable server support.

Most providers have very fast connections to the Internet such as a full T3 fiber-optic (45 Megabytes per second) connections which is about 1000 high speed (56 Kilobytes per second) modems combined.

For those who are looking to set up their own servers and host their own websites, a personal computer is often not powerful enough to do the job. As the name suggests, a personal computer can hardly handle multiple visitors to your website- servers are needed to handle these visitors simultaneously.

Getting Your Web Hosting

There are thousands of companies that offer web hosting for your website. Which to choose and what to look out for? With the multitude of features and terms in each hosting plan, it can be puzzling for those who are just starting out. The golden rule in choosing your website: Nothing beats reliable web hosting. Many web hosting plans offer more space, more benefits than others. The decision to your web hosting should be based on reliability. We have seen too many disappointed website owners who chose benefits and space over reliability.




About the Author


Lester Boey works in an Australian Web Design and Internet Marketing company -Australian Seo and Web Designs Services - http://www.definiteweb.com/
His life revolves around websites; providing full-time and freelance seo services to US and Australian businesses. Email: projects@definiteweb.com




isp

Saturday, November 05, 2005

Personal Computers, Servers Or ISP?

You need a server to host your site so that it can be viewed over the internet. This server can either be an Internet Service Provider or of your own. Most websites are hosted by an Internet Service Provider because they can provide powerful server hardware, high speed connections and reliable server support.

Most providers have very fast connections to the Internet such as a full T3 fiber-optic (45 Megabytes per second) connections which is about 1000 high speed (56 Kilobytes per second) modems combined.

For those who are looking to set up their own servers and host their own websites, a personal computer is often not powerful enough to do the job. As the name suggests, a personal computer can hardly handle multiple visitors to your website- servers are needed to handle these visitors simultaneously.

Getting Your Web Hosting

There are thousands of companies that offer web hosting for your website. Which to choose and what to look out for? With the multitude of features and terms in each hosting plan, it can be puzzling for those who are just starting out. The golden rule in choosing your website: Nothing beats reliable web hosting. Many web hosting plans offer more space, more benefits than others. The decision to your web hosting should be based on reliability. We have seen too many disappointed website owners who chose benefits and space over reliability.




About the Author


Lester Boey works in an Australian Web Design and Internet Marketing company -Australian Seo and Web Designs Services - http://www.definiteweb.com/
His life revolves around websites; providing full-time and freelance seo services to US and Australian businesses. Email: projects@definiteweb.com




isp

Friday, November 04, 2005

Your Most Valuable Asset
by Bob Osgoodby

Email to some is simply a way to contact friends and family and keep in touch. To others, it is a very important method of communicating with business associates.

Unfortunately, those who send out unsolicited ads have created a problem for both. It seems the amount of spam received daily increases geometrically, and try as we might, we just can't keep ahead of the game.

Let's talk about some of the more serious offenders. We have all received email, and tried to respond, only to have the response returned as undeliverable. These people forge an email address, and are basically dishonest. Anyone who does business with their ilk, deserves what they get.

High up on the list of "pains in the neck" are people who list an auto-responder as their return address, and program it to send out a series of emails on a regular basis. If you reply to them and ask to be removed, you will get at least five or more emails from them over a short period of time. These people are simply naive, as they continue bothering you, even though asked to cease and desist.

Another winner in this "hit parade" is the "fresh from the farm newbie" who harvests (or if they are really dumb buys a list) thousands of names and starts sending out unsolicited email. Thinking they have found the keys to the vault, they start sending out spam by the thousands. They really take offense when their ISP (Internet Service Provider) cancels their account.

Many people try to disguise the subject of their email. They try to make it look like something else, just to get you to open it. Don't these morons realize that if I'm not interested in their porno site, or what ever other offer they are making, trying to trick me isn't going to change my mind. In point of fact, it is aggravating, and if there ever was a spark of interest in what they are hawking, that quickly disappeared.

And don't you just love the "brain trust" who sends out his/her thousands of emails and shows the email address of everyone they sent it to. Spammers who may receive their ad have just added another thousand or so names to their list.

Let's look at the flip side of this coin. First let's agree that we don't like spam. Some people however, really "flip out" and make it their holy grail to get even. In the early days of the Internet, one solution was to send back hundreds of copies of a long document hoping to fill their mailboxes. That worked for a while, but modern email readers let someone preview an email and they quickly delete this "reverse spam".

Another group sends complaints to the ISP of the offender. If the spammer used a forged address however, they quickly learn that this is a waste of time. They receive back a very nice note from the ISP, telling them that the address they are complaining about doesn't exist on their server. They stop doing this very quickly, but still hate spam.

They then buy software that will parse a note and send a complaint to every URL or email address contained in the spam. Or worse yet, they complain to some self-appointed guardian of the web who does it for them. This is OK if it is a legitimate piece of spam, but I have seen this done by someone who subscribed to a Newsletter, had a very senior moment, forgot they had subscribed, and did it to the publisher.

This means that the ISP of every single URL or email address contained in the newsletter gets sent a complaint. This includes everyone who is identifiable in the Newsletter such as the authors of the articles, the advertisers in the Newsletter and anyone else who happens to have their web site listed there. Hey folks this just isn't fair.

There are too many other ways to solve the problem of spam arriving in your mailbox. First of all, much spam is generated if you use your email address on the web or in a chat room. Your best bet is get free "throw away" addresses, and when the need for the address doesn't exist any longer, simply cancel it.

If you own your own domain, use an address that you tie in with your advertising. When that starts to get overloaded, and it will, change it in your ads and filter messages to the old address to your trash bin.

Is it a bane or is it a boon. If you let it control you, it falls into the first category. But if you use it intelligently, it can be a most valuable asset to you and your business.




About the Author


Bob has been publishing online since 1996. All the "tricks of the trade" are contained in his latest E-book. Learn how to avoid being shut down by your ISP for Spamming, and where to find "E-mail friendly ISP's. Learn which software packages are available to easily manage and distribute your email. For more information - http://www.adv-marketing.com/business/handbook.htm



Thursday, November 03, 2005

If you have spent much time earning a living on the Internet, few things will surprise you. However, I am always amazed with how many companies and individuals make astounding claims without backing them up.

Web hosts and ISPs make such claims all the time: 99% uptime. Some web hosts post on their site live results of their uptime from a third-party web site monitoring company. However, those hosts are very few.

Here are four reasons why every web host and ISP (Internet service provider) should post uptime and connectivity statistics from an independent, third-party web site monitoring firm, with an external monitoring network.

Monitoring reports are excellent marketing tools

This is the most obvious reason a web host or ISP should post monitoring reports on their site. Don�t tell me you have 99% uptime. Even the worst hosting companies and ISPs can make that claim, but it does not make it true. Prove it to me. Posting a report right on your home page, or posting a link to the report up front on the home page tells me you not only can make claims, but you can deliver!

Make sure to post your uptime statistics for the last day, week, month and year, so the customers know you are in it for the tong haul.

Web site monitoring reduces technical support work-load

A recent review by Dotcom-Monitor reveals that accessibility calls to a web host�s technical support can be reduced by 30% just by posting the current status of the web site as reported by an independent monitoring service.

Often a user will call technical support if he encounters a slow Internet connection or download times, dial-up problems, web site accessibility or various computer issues. Users assume the problem is with their web host or their ISP, and call technical support to fix the problem, even if the problem is on their computer.

Real time independent connectivity reports eliminate the need for such calls in many cases, by showing what the status of the site is. A sample report at http://www.dotcom-monitor.com/reporting-card.asp gives an idea of how this works.

Web site monitoring is good customer relations

If it costs up to ten times more to attract a new customer than to keep an existing one, independent web site monitoring can help you keep those precious customers.

Nothing is more frustrating for the end-user than to have her site down and nothing is more embarrassing for an ISP to receive a call from customer about a downtime, especially if it is related to a connectivity issue the hosting company or ISP is not even aware of.

An external monitoring network can alert an ISP or web host immediately to problems that often cannot be detected by internal monitoring, allowing the company to address the issue immediately�and hopefully before a customer even notices that a problem exists.

Monitoring cuts the burden of dispute resolution

Corporate hosting clients and Internet access customers often expect certain levels of service and enter into an SLA (service level agreement). Often, SLA contracts impose fines on ISPs and web hosts who do not meet the targets. Determining how those levels are measured can be difficult, but an independent, third-party monitoring service can easily resolve disputes before they begin.

Dotcom-Monitor is among those services that provides an added SLA reporting function, which can be seen at http://www.dotcom-monitor.com/service-level-agreement.asp . Both the host or ISP and the client can view the reports, and reporting intervals can be set based on the terms of the SLA contract.

While every web site can benefit from some form of monitoring, no class of business needs more the credibility of an independent monitoring service as much as those who provide access to the Internet for their clients: ISPs and web hosting companies.


About The Author

David Leonhardt is a freelance writer and SEO consultant:
http://www.seo-writer.net
He wrote this article for Dotcom-Monitor Web Site Monitoring
http://www.dotcom-monitor.com
More information on web site monitoring
http://www.dotcom-monitor.com/web-site-monitoring.asp
More information on network monitoring
http://www.dotcom-monitor.com/network-monitoring.asp
Info@thehappyguy.com




isp

Wednesday, November 02, 2005

If you have spent much time earning a living on the Internet, few things will surprise you. However, I am always amazed with how many companies and individuals make astounding claims without backing them up.

Web hosts and ISPs make such claims all the time: 99% uptime. Some web hosts post on their site live results of their uptime from a third-party web site monitoring company. However, those hosts are very few.

Here are four reasons why every web host and ISP (Internet service provider) should post uptime and connectivity statistics from an independent, third-party web site monitoring firm, with an external monitoring network.

Monitoring reports are excellent marketing tools

This is the most obvious reason a web host or ISP should post monitoring reports on their site. Don�t tell me you have 99% uptime. Even the worst hosting companies and ISPs can make that claim, but it does not make it true. Prove it to me. Posting a report right on your home page, or posting a link to the report up front on the home page tells me you not only can make claims, but you can deliver!

Make sure to post your uptime statistics for the last day, week, month and year, so the customers know you are in it for the tong haul.

Web site monitoring reduces technical support work-load

A recent review by Dotcom-Monitor reveals that accessibility calls to a web host�s technical support can be reduced by 30% just by posting the current status of the web site as reported by an independent monitoring service.

Often a user will call technical support if he encounters a slow Internet connection or download times, dial-up problems, web site accessibility or various computer issues. Users assume the problem is with their web host or their ISP, and call technical support to fix the problem, even if the problem is on their computer.

Real time independent connectivity reports eliminate the need for such calls in many cases, by showing what the status of the site is. A sample report at http://www.dotcom-monitor.com/reporting-card.asp gives an idea of how this works.

Web site monitoring is good customer relations

If it costs up to ten times more to attract a new customer than to keep an existing one, independent web site monitoring can help you keep those precious customers.

Nothing is more frustrating for the end-user than to have her site down and nothing is more embarrassing for an ISP to receive a call from customer about a downtime, especially if it is related to a connectivity issue the hosting company or ISP is not even aware of.

An external monitoring network can alert an ISP or web host immediately to problems that often cannot be detected by internal monitoring, allowing the company to address the issue immediately�and hopefully before a customer even notices that a problem exists.

Monitoring cuts the burden of dispute resolution

Corporate hosting clients and Internet access customers often expect certain levels of service and enter into an SLA (service level agreement). Often, SLA contracts impose fines on ISPs and web hosts who do not meet the targets. Determining how those levels are measured can be difficult, but an independent, third-party monitoring service can easily resolve disputes before they begin.

Dotcom-Monitor is among those services that provides an added SLA reporting function, which can be seen at http://www.dotcom-monitor.com/service-level-agreement.asp . Both the host or ISP and the client can view the reports, and reporting intervals can be set based on the terms of the SLA contract.

While every web site can benefit from some form of monitoring, no class of business needs more the credibility of an independent monitoring service as much as those who provide access to the Internet for their clients: ISPs and web hosting companies.


About The Author

David Leonhardt is a freelance writer and SEO consultant:
http://www.seo-writer.net
He wrote this article for Dotcom-Monitor Web Site Monitoring
http://www.dotcom-monitor.com
More information on web site monitoring
http://www.dotcom-monitor.com/web-site-monitoring.asp
More information on network monitoring
http://www.dotcom-monitor.com/network-monitoring.asp
Info@thehappyguy.com



Friday, October 28, 2005

Okay, so you are finally tired of those slow dial-up internet connections, and you want to go broadband. Good deal. But first, you may be wondering which type of broadband connection is best- DSL or Cable? Or, at least, which of the two gives you more speed for the price? Here we take a look at these two popular broadband connections and try to determine which one is better: DSL vs. Cable.

Cable Speed vs. DSL

The most common question that comes up is which type of connection is faster, DSL or Cable? To answer this, it is important to compare both upload and download speeds. Now, so you have something to compare these speeds to, your average dial-up connection is about 28 - 56 Kbps. Most often, however, you won't be able to get 56k through dial up, as most services can not handle this speed.

The average speed of a DSL download is 1.0 - 1.5Mbps. That's megabytes per second - about 20 times as fast as the fastest dial-up connection. This is fast, but consider Cable, which can give you up to 2 - 3Mbps. Thus, at least for downloading, cable can give you almost twice the speed of DSL - that's impressive. On the upload side, however, cable and DSL are pretty evenly matched. They both provide about 100Kbps - 400Kbps. It seems that cable has won this battle.

What about Price and Quality of Service?

There is more to discuss here besides the speed of the connections. Take price for one. Cable and DSL connections are both going to be more expensive than dial-up. But, DSL seems to be the cheaper of the two at the moment. You can get a good DSL internet connection for about $35 - $45 per month. Cable modem will cost you about $45 or $50 (this price may be included in a cable TV package). These prices, however, are really close and they change almost from month to month.

DSL is nice because you can talk on the phone and be online at the same time. In addition, business-level DSL service provides guaranteed data rates, so your connection speed is never a surprise. On the other hand, DSL speed tends to decrease the further you are away from the data center, and it is typically not as widely available as Cable. Cable speeds are not dependent on distance from the data center, and is occasionally cheaper than DSL when included in a cable TV rate. A cable modem, however, may require costly professional installation, and there may exists some limitations on downloads and uploads. All of these factors should be taken into consideration when choosing either broadband service.



About the Author


Bradley James is a senior editor at SciNet.cc, a website containing many helpful consumer electronics review articles. For more information on dsl and cable technology, please visit our Cable vs DSL webpage.




isp

Thursday, October 27, 2005

Okay, so you are finally tired of those slow dial-up internet connections, and you want to go broadband. Good deal. But first, you may be wondering which type of broadband connection is best- DSL or Cable? Or, at least, which of the two gives you more speed for the price? Here we take a look at these two popular broadband connections and try to determine which one is better: DSL vs. Cable.

Cable Speed vs. DSL

The most common question that comes up is which type of connection is faster, DSL or Cable? To answer this, it is important to compare both upload and download speeds. Now, so you have something to compare these speeds to, your average dial-up connection is about 28 - 56 Kbps. Most often, however, you won't be able to get 56k through dial up, as most services can not handle this speed.

The average speed of a DSL download is 1.0 - 1.5Mbps. That's megabytes per second - about 20 times as fast as the fastest dial-up connection. This is fast, but consider Cable, which can give you up to 2 - 3Mbps. Thus, at least for downloading, cable can give you almost twice the speed of DSL - that's impressive. On the upload side, however, cable and DSL are pretty evenly matched. They both provide about 100Kbps - 400Kbps. It seems that cable has won this battle.

What about Price and Quality of Service?

There is more to discuss here besides the speed of the connections. Take price for one. Cable and DSL connections are both going to be more expensive than dial-up. But, DSL seems to be the cheaper of the two at the moment. You can get a good DSL internet connection for about $35 - $45 per month. Cable modem will cost you about $45 or $50 (this price may be included in a cable TV package). These prices, however, are really close and they change almost from month to month.

DSL is nice because you can talk on the phone and be online at the same time. In addition, business-level DSL service provides guaranteed data rates, so your connection speed is never a surprise. On the other hand, DSL speed tends to decrease the further you are away from the data center, and it is typically not as widely available as Cable. Cable speeds are not dependent on distance from the data center, and is occasionally cheaper than DSL when included in a cable TV rate. A cable modem, however, may require costly professional installation, and there may exists some limitations on downloads and uploads. All of these factors should be taken into consideration when choosing either broadband service.



About the Author


Bradley James is a senior editor at SciNet.cc, a website containing many helpful consumer electronics review articles. For more information on dsl and cable technology, please visit our Cable vs DSL webpage.